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Deebo, With the 7J wheel rim I would stay with the 235. As you appear unable to locate 60 ratio the 65 would as you indicate be slightly larger in diameter (just under 12mm gain in height) and speedo error of 1.6kmh lower than actual travel speed. A possible benefit of 65 ratio would be slightly better sidewall flexing which would provide better ride comfort on bumpy roads or tracks if that is a useful consideration. Do just be mindful that 'technically' this sizing 235/65R17 is not a GM listed size.
 

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235-65-17 is normal size for winter tires. I had them on my 2007 model Captiva awd. Next tires I bought were of same size.
 

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Discussion Starter #43
This says that the 65 will give a difference in height of almost 24mm, and is not allowed? The total difference is 3.29% and can not be above 1.5% it says.
But i am not worried for the annual technical inspection or something because i have another set of 17 inch wheels as well.
But i'm just concerned for the mechanical bits like the automatic transmission etc. Because of the wheel rotations on wich it is based. I don't know if i am using the right words to explain it, but i hope you understand what i mean :)
1588
 

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The gain in overall height is not the same as the gain in ride height.
If you refer to my earlier post #37 the information chart I provide there was extracted from the Official GM data for the 2008 Captiva.
No where does it list a 65 profile tyre. Suitability is therefore at user/owners responsibility in consideration of any Road Rules which may apply in your Country.
It is clear to me that you are going to do what you want to do despite all the information provided by members of this Forum.
 

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Discussion Starter #45
I know it was not on a chart from GM, but Nordic owner fitted them on his, and said it was a normal size for winter tires, thats why i asked :)
 

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Unless Member Nordic has different build information for his Country specification for the Captiva then my observation is the same as I told you - "Alternative suitability is therefore at user/owners responsibility in consideration of any Road Rules which may apply in your Country."
Vehicle manufacturers (like GM) spend million upon millions of dollars designing , building, testing vehicles and the components to produce a final specification. Just because a Forum member decided to use a particular item does that supersede the Manufacturers specification and make it 'approved'. You know the answer to that.
You are asking Forum Members about the potential impact on the mechanical components. Why should a Forum member be expected to override or have a greater knowledge base than GM after the $millions they have invested to produce a compatible specification.
 

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I had 235-65-17 fitted as new winter tires by the Chevrolet dealer. In my opinion 65 profile suits better for 17" rim than 60 profile. As Ed said different countries may have own regulations which
should be checked. I could recommend two options : 235-65-17 or 235-55-18 which i had both ( as new). 17" for winter tires and 18" for summer tires.
 

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Some insurance claims would not be paid out in the case of an accident as the steering geometry would be altered with different size tyres on the axles. Even a slight variation in radius is going to affect the AWD system and will certainly put stress on the components. 4x4 clubs with raised suspensions and over sized tyres, to clear obstacles and go beyond what but hey are designed for will work well off road but are treacherous at times on the road.
 

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It is said that this type of AWD system is switching the rear wheels on when one of the wheels is moving with different speed to others. This would happen constantly In case you have different
size of tyres in rear and front axles. This might damage the system evidently in case all the wheels are running all the time. I have understood that even 5mm difference in rotation could
make that effect ( ??). This would mean that two new tyres in a same axle with two old tyres would make a risk (??). In winter time AWD is not even noticeable in normal driving. You just feel the
difference in a traffic lights when the car beats the others without wheels slipper. Or when driving on icy roads and the car moves like a train... I am still missing the light telling when the AWD is working. However, sometimes i can see the light illuminating when driving in a heavy snow or uphill. Would somebody correct me if i am wrong with these tyre sizes .. ??
 

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I agree about the tyre size, the electronics will not like it. I have had the AWD light flicker on when two wheels are in mud and two on the tar, I have tried to loose traction in the snow on a field and it does then. I think the traction control and ABS try and work against each-other for a split second.
 
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