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Discussion Starter #1
Well, shortly after buying my 2007 Matiz 1.0 SE, the passenger door window stopped going down. Then it stopped going up and down. Luckily it was in the up position, totally closed, when it stopped moving.
It doesn't matter whither I use the drivers door switch or the passenger door switch it won't move.
I took the door panel off and measured for voltage at the connector to the motor. +12.5V on the blue, when trying to lower, and -12.5V when trying to raise the window, eg) looks like current is present and switch is changing polarity as it should. Next to get the motor out. How? I can't see any way to get the motor and slider parts out since it's stuck in the up position and I can't get at the window glass/actuator screws. The only way I can think of is by using a hole cutter to make additional holes in the door where the screws are. The window makes a thunk when trying to raise it further with either switch, but no sound at all when trying to lower it. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
 

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From what I can see the window needs to be down to remove the glass. Then once the glass has been removed the mechanism can be removed from the door.
It may be that once of the cables in the mechanism has failed.
 

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Hi Bp51 It looks like the window motor is working for raising window but not for lowering. This suggests you have a good motor and a supply fault. To lower the window disconnect the motor connector through the door aperture and jumper the motor connector with a 12v supply [a bike battery?]. if possible provide a fuse in the jumper setup. As you will appreciate you may need to reverse connections to lower the glass, be care of shorting. With a bit of luck you should now be able to investigate the upset further.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Many thanks for the replies. JMCroft Yes, it needs to be in the down position to get the glass out with the cable duct disconnected at the bottom. The trouble is it's stuck in the up position (which means no access to the window screws) and I can't get it to go down. You can get your fingers around the lower cable which pulls it down but it won't go down because the top cable (for pulling it up) is tight into the motor and you need the motor out to disconnect the cable.. I'm thinking it's a mechanical issue with a jammed cable or drum inside the motor. Jasty, The voltage at the connector (the one that connects to the motor) gives 12.5 Volts with the polarity reversing as it should when the door switch is actuated in both directions, which indicates the supply and the switch are good. As you say, the fact that it goes up suggests the motor is ok. I do have a spare motorbike battery which I could try it with though so I'll give it a go and see if that does the trick. If it doesn't it looks like I'm going to have to cut those holes...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Many thanks for the replies. JMCroft Yes, it needs to be in the down position to get the glass out with the cable duct disconnected at the bottom. The trouble is it's stuck in the up position (which means no access to the window screws) and I can't get it to go down. You can get your fingers around the lower cable which pulls it down but it won't go down because the top cable (for pulling it up) is tight into the motor and you need the motor out to disconnect the cable.. I'm thinking it's a mechanical issue with a jammed cable or drum inside the motor. Jasty, The voltage at the connector (the one that connects to the motor) gives 12.5 Volts with the polarity reversing as it should when the door switch is actuated in both directions, which indicates the supply and the switch are good. As you say, the fact that it goes up suggests the motor is ok. I do have a spare motorbike battery which I could try it with though so I'll give it a go and see if that does the trick. If it doesn't it looks like I'm going to have to cut those holes...
Well I tried my spare motorbike battery across the two motor terminals and whadya know! The window goes up and down perfectly! (thanks Jasty!) So motor and cables etc. are ok. Since the window goes up ok, I can only think it's the feed which supplies both the main switch and the passenger door switch, or one of the connectors or wires (possibly earth/return) which feeds them. Watch this space...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well I tried my spare motorbike battery across the two motor terminals and whadya know! The window goes up and down perfectly! (thanks Jasty!) So motor and cables etc. are ok. Since the window goes up ok, I can only think it's the feed which supplies both the main switch and the passenger door switch, or one of the connectors or wires (possibly earth/return) which feeds them. Watch this space...
Success! Looking at the wiring diagram showed that the problem could be a connection in either door switch or the connecting wiring, so I took off the drivers side panel and got my multitester on the terminals. It showed that there was a resistance of over 30 Ohms on the "down" part of the switch, the other connections were less than 3 Ohms, so I gave the connector and the switch a good dousing in WD40 and used a bit of manipulation. It dropped to 4 Ohms and hey presto the drivers door switches were operating as per normal, but the passenger side was still the same. I used the same treatment on the passenger door switch and all is back to normal. I have newfound respect for WD40!
Thanks for all the great advice.
 

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Pete glad of the successful outcome, however might be a worthwhile investment in new switches as it sounds like you may have had a bit of corrosion in there. Suppose there will be a natural build up of carbon with the engagement of the switch over time but there must come a point where swap out will be the only permanent remedy.

However kudos for your solution will bare it mind if I run into same symptoms.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Pete glad of the successful outcome, however might be a worthwhile investment in new switches as it sounds like you may have had a bit of corrosion in there. Suppose there will be a natural build up of carbon with the engagement of the switch over time but there must come a point where swap out will be the only permanent remedy.

However kudos for your solution will bare it mind if I run into same symptoms.
Hi Wilkinsm.
TBH I sort of stumbled along until I found the problem (make that methodical search..) The switches actually look like brand new from outside, and I can't imagine they're all gunged up inside, but I think maybe a fine layer of oxidation on the contacts caused the high resistance. The car had been standing a while before I bought it. Actually while I was investigating I found both my battery terminals were loose because they needed washers to take up some slack on the shouldered terminal bolts, but the car was still starting and running ok!.
Next job will be cam belt and the other drivebelts...
 

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Indeed I tend to find that optical examination for electrical stuff is a bit pointless and best to trust a meter reading. Don't envy you the job with the belts, haven't done a cam belt on tizzy yet, but have on a renault scenic (definitely not a job for feint hearted). Maybe a 3 cylinder car is easier.... then again doubt it...

good luck
 

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Pete, Good to hear of successful resolution. The posting of the solution is often sadly lacking on many posts and it is so frustrating to look up a topic ony to find the 'ending' left hanging in the air.
Well done all the other contributors. Teamwork (y)
 
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