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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Everyone, i am new to this forum.


Just bought a captiva 2009 ltx model and the oil service light has come on however the oil has been changed, does anyone know how to reset this light just wondered if there is any software i could get for the laptop so i can set it my self. i presume this can only be done via the 16 pin diagnostic socket under thedash.



thankyou





paul
 

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paul21 said:
Hi Everyone, i am new to this forum.


Just bought a captiva 2009 ltx model and the oil service light has come on however the oil has been changed, does anyone know how to reset this light just wondered if there is any software i could get for the laptop so i can set it my self. i presume this can only be done via the 16 pin diagnostic socket under thedash.



thankyou





paul
I can't remember exactly but there are 2 methods, either by scan tool or by using the acellerator- it's in the owners handbook in the service section. If you don't have it, let me know and I'll post later when i get home.
 

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Switch on ignition, Fully press throttle pedal 3 times within 5 seconds, Switch of ignition.


Simple as that.
 

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My dad, a mechanic all his life, god rest him, would be so proud...
 

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The oil light might have come on from the fact that there is diesel contamination in the oil due to the diesel particulate filter not having functioned correctly. at times the engine management will inject exttra fuel into the engine to "burn" off the soot collected in the dpf, however if the cycle is not completed fuel can pass into the sump and this will give an indication of "change oil immediately"

suggest to you and all captiva /epica owners to do intermediate oil changes at 5000 mile intervals. if you book online National tyres will do it (including unipart filter gfe650)for £46 less 10% online, however you can get an original chevrolet filter for £20. so it means castrol edge 5w40 turbo diesel oil and filter change for about £62. if you get the dpf light on GO TO YOUR DEALER FAST. Ps I don't work for National, it' just that for Oil changes in between annual services I get my oil changes done elsewhere, Also note that you will have to allow a few days to order online because the filter is not normally stocked and must be specially ordered. Most big chevrolet dealers will have them in stock. If you do got to a dealer be prepared to pay £150 for oil and filter change using fully synthetic.


Ps make sure you do a dual carriageway run at good speeds about every 300 miles to ensure the dpf goed through it cycle.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thankyou Oldroverboy,
this is most helpfull and i will investigate it straight away.

 

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I would have suggested that, but from the post it appeared the oil had just been changed. Sorry if I got that wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hi, Thanks for your replychecked the oil it looks fine you can tell its recently been changed,
 

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Paul, check the vosa recall for your steering, elsewhere in this captiva forum there is an excellent link, if anyone has a cruze 1.8 there is also a recall,
for information on dual mass flywheels and diesel particulate filters there is some goof information on the honest john web forums.



happy motoring
 

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2010 Captiva 2.0 LTX diesel.

Apologies for hijacking an old thread, but my oil service light came on just before Christmas. I spoke to my local dealer who mentioned the diesel-in-oil issue with the DPF but said it wasn't covered by either the warranty or servicing (which we paid for in advance when we bought the car).

He said the oil may need to be charged at a cost of £115.00


I checked the oil and the levels are fine but how would I be able to tell if there was diesel in it?

Incidentally I reset the oil service light myself (ignition "on", press accelerator 3 times, ignition "off"), and it hasn't come back on - does that mean all's well?
 

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Great you got the light off. But in the future if you do want to talk to the car I use a ELM 327 car diagnostic fault code reader scan tool. On ebay for £14.95 + postage. Down load software and plug into you re laptop via cable provided, look at the ebay siteI have foundmine very good.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
What can i say, just come home from work and the oil service light has come on again the level has increased indicating diesel has gone into the oil, you can also tell from the smell, very strong diesel smell.
Looks like its in need of oil servce very quickly not going to drive it until its done or it will wreck the engine, what i would like to know how frequently does it push diesel into the oil and why can anyone help please



 

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Do you do alot of short journeys Paul? I had a Mazda 5 a few years back and that particular problem was caused by frequent short journeys, where the car doesn't reach full operating temperature. Luckily I never had that problem as my commute is 25 miles!
 

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I asked the service guy at my local dealer to explain why pushing neat diesel into the oil helps with burning off carbon from the exhaust system. He couldn't.Can anyone here tell me?
 

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Phoenix126 said:
I asked the service guy at my local dealer to explain why pushing neat diesel into the oil helps with burning off carbon from the exhaust system. He couldn't.
Can anyone here tell me?
It happens during the regeneration of the DPF. The following came from a Jag owner's site;
Diesel Particulate Filter
Diesel emissions are 90% lower than they were in the 1980s; however exhaust regulations based on statistical
studies dealing with the health impact of exhaust emissions continue to demand even lower gaseous and particulate
diesel emissions. Particulate emissions are responsible for the characteristic black exhaust fumes emitted from the diesel
engine. They are a complex mixture of solid and liquid components with the majority of particulates being carbon
microspheres on which hydrocarbons from the engines fuel and lubricant condense.
In order to comply with the strict European Stage IV emission standard, which now stipulates a further 50% reduction in
particulate emissions, an exhaust emission control system is used on the XJ 2.7 liter and S-TYPE 2.7 liter diesel vehicles.
The primary component of the system is the diesel particulate filter (DPF), which has been proven to be effective in reducing particulate emissions to negligible levels. The main ability of the particulate filter is its capacity for regeneration; that is burning the particulates trapped in the filter at calculated intervals in such a way that the process is unnoticed by the driver of the vehicle.

Operation of the Diesel Particulate Filter
To enable the exhaust emission control system to store and when conditions determine, burn the particulates, the diesel particulate filter uses new filter technology based on a filter with a catalytic coating. Made of silicon carbide the filter is packaged into a steel container installed in the exhaust system of the vehicle. The filter has good thermal shock resistance and thermal conductivity properties, plus a closely controlled porosity. The filter is tailored to the engines requirements to maintain the most favorable exhaust backpressure.
The porous substrate in the filters interior consists of thousands of small parallel channels running in the exhausts longitudinal direction, adjacent channels in the filter are alternately plugged at each end. This arrangement forces the exhaust gases to flow through the porous walls, which acts as the filters medium. Particulates that are too big to pass through the porous walls are left behind and stored in the channels. To prevent the particulates creating an obstruction to the exhaust gas flow, the filter system provides a regeneration mechanism, which involves raising the temperature of the filter to such an extent that the particulates are incinerated and as a result removed from the filter.
The most important parameters influencing filter regeneration is the temperature of the exhaust gases and filter. With this in mind the composition of the filter also includes a wash coating to the surface of the filter comprising platinum and
other active components; materials used in the manufacture of oxidation catalytic converters. At certain exhaust gas and filter temperatures the catalytic coating promotes combustion and therefore burning of the particulates, while also oxidizing carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions.
Exhaust gas and filter temperatures are controlled by the diesel particulate filter (DPF) module, which is incorporated in the powertrain control module (PCM). The DPF module monitors the load status of the particulate filter based on driving style, distance driven, and signals from the differential pressure sensor. When the particulate loading in the filter reaches a threshold, the filter is actively regenerated by adjusting, in accordance with requirements various engine-control functions; such as:


<UL>.fuel injection,
.intake-air throttle,
.glow-plug activation,
.exhaust-gas recirculation, and
.boost-pressure control.
[/list]
This control function is made possible by the flexibility of the common-rail fuel injection engine in providing the precise
control of:


<UL>.fuel-flow
.fuel pressure, and
.injection timing,
[/list]
all essential requirements for an efficient regeneration process.
Two processes are used to regenerate the particulate filter,'passive regeneration' and 'active regeneration' both of which are discussed below:
Passive Regeneration
Passive regeneration involves the slow environment-protecting conversion of the particulates deposited in the filter into carbon dioxide. This regeneration process comes into effect when the filters temperature reaches 250*C and occurs continuously when the vehicle is being driven at higher engine loads and speeds. No special engine management intervention is initiated during passive regeneration, allowing the engine to operate as normal.
Only a portion of the particulates are converted to carbon dioxide during passive regeneration and due to chemical
reaction this process is only effective within the temperature range of 250*C to 500*C. Above this temperature range the
conversion efficiency of the particulates into carbon dioxide subsides as the temperature of the filter increases.
Active regeneration
Active regeneration commences when the particulate loading in the filter reaches a threshold as monitored and determined by the DPF module. This calculation is based on driving style, distance driven and exhaust backpressure signals supplied by the differential pressure sensor. Active regeneration generally occurs approximately every 400 kilometers (250 miles) although this will depend on how the vehicle is driven.
For example, if the vehicle has operated for a length of time at low-loads for instance in urban traffic, active regeneration will be initiated more often. This is due to a more rapid build up of particulates in the filter than if the vehicle has been driven periodically at greater speeds, where passive regeneration would have occurred.
A mileage trigger incorporated within the DPF module is used as a backup for initiating active regeneration. If after a threshold distance has been driven and regeneration has not been activated by backpressure signals; regeneration will then be requested on the basis of distance driven.
Active regeneration of the particulate filter is started by raising the temperature in the particulate filter up to the
combustion temperature of the particulates. A principal method of increasing the exhaust gas temperature is by
introducing post-injection of the fuel, that is after the pilot and main fuel injections have taken place. This is achieved
by the DPF module processing signals from the temperature sensor to determine the temperature of the particulate filter and depending on the filters temperature, the DPF module commands either one or two post-injections:



<UL>.First post-injection retards combustion inside the cylinder to increase the heat of the exhaust gas.
.Second post-injection injects fuel late in the power stroke cycle; fuel partly combusts in the cylinder but also sweeps down the exhaust where unburned fuel triggers an exothermal event in the catalyst, raising the filters temperature further.
[/list]

Active regeneration takes approximately 20 minutes to complete. The first phase is to raise the temperature of the filter to particulate combustion temperature of 500*C.
In the second phase the temperature is raised to 600*C, the optimum particulate combustion temperature. This temperature is maintained for 15 to 20 minutes to ensure complete incineration of the particulates captured in the filter. The incinerated particulates produce carbon dioxide and water.
Active regeneration is controlled to achieve a target temperature of 600*C at the inlet of the particulate filter without exceeding the temperature limits of the turbochargers and close-coupled catalysts; refer to 'Active Regeneration
Protection Limits' below.
During the active regeneration period:



<UL>.The turbochargers are maintained in the fully open position to minimize heat transmission from the exhaust gas to the turbochargers and to reduce the rate of gas flow through the particulate filter. This enables optimum heating of the particulate filter. If the driver demands a higher torque the turbochargers will respond by closing the vanes as required.
.The throttle is closed as this assists in increasing the exhaust gas temperature and reducing the rate of exhaust gas flow,
both of which increase the speed at which particulate filter is heated.
.The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve is closed as the use of EGR lowers exhaust gas temperatures and therefore makes it difficult to achieve the regeneration temperature in the particulate filter.
.The glow plugs are sometimes activated to provide additional heat in raising the temperature of the particulate filter. To maintain glow plug serviceability the activation period of the glow plugs is restricted to 40 seconds.
[/list]

The regeneration process also compensates for ambient temperature changes.

WARNING: Due to the high temperatures which can occur in the particulate filter, care should be taken when working within the vicinity of the filter.

WARNING: Due to the high temperatures which can occur in the particulate filter, it is advisable not to park the vehicle:



<UL>.Where the filter can come into contact with flammable materials underneath the vehicle.
.Where exhaust gasses emitted from the exhaust tail pipe can come into contact with flammable materials.
[/list]

Engine Oil Dilution
A disadvantage of active regeneration is engine oil dilution caused by small amounts of fuel entering the engine crankcase during the post-injection phases. This has made it necessary, in some circumstances to reduce the oil service intervals; the driver of the vehicle is alerted to this by the instrument-cluster message centre.
An algorithm programmed in the DPF module monitors driving style, active regeneration frequency and duration.
Using this information the module predicts the level of oil dilution. When the oil dilution level reaches a threshold value (the fuel being 7% of engine oil volume), a red warning lamp and 'Service Required' message is displayed.
Depending on driving style, a small percentage of vehicles will require an oil change before the standard 15,000 miles service interval. If an engine oil dilution event does occur the vehicle will undergo its full service and the service mileage counter will be reset to zero by the service technician. Refer to GTR for further information on resetting the service mileage counter.
Fuel Consumption
There will be a small increase in fuel consumption due to active regeneration of the particulate filter.
During regeneration the fuel consumption approximately doubles. However, because regeneration happens relatively
infrequently the overall increase in fuel consumption is small.
This is accounted for in both the instantaneous and average fuel economy displayed in the instrument cluster


The bit on fuel consumption is interesting.... it might explain alot!
 

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Very informative bigiainw I new about oil dilution through unburntdiesel passing the rings and going down the cylinders. but did not realise that the burn off in the DPF came from neat diesel injected at cylinder level, I was under the misapprehension it was injected into the DPF its self to get the burn. So yes oldroverboy I am certainly going to do some intermediate oil changes and try to cut down on short runs of which I do too many [use wife's car insteadits petrol].
 
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