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Hello everyone! Sorry for this being a long firs post.
I have trawled the whole “interwebs” and I came across with the same issues: Captiva (Antara) DPF problems... Loss of power, black smoke, frequent regeneration.

My Captiva got so bad that the black smoke would look like a video game cheat code! The drivers behind me would close their windows and wave their hands in front of their nose!
I was worried that if the black smoke would happen in front of the Plods I would be in deep trouble. (Left alone it would be a M.O.T fail!)
Therefore, I have decided to replace my DPF!
Disclaimer: I am not a professional mechanic!
Do it at your own risk!
The options were the following:

New DPF from Chevy or authorised OEM (Very expensive!)
Used DPF from EBay (£325.00) Not guaranteed to be in good shape
DPF cleaning service (minimum £180.00 and might not solve the issue working as a temporary fix)

I have opted for a manufactured DPF. It comes clean from soot and has warranty.
This can be bought on Ebay for £447.00. (It comes with new brackets and gaskets!)

Contra DPF

Optional tools:

Extension adaptor set:

Car retainer clips and tools


WARNING: (engine must be cold!)

Checklist:
- Tools
- Replacement DPF
- A/C refill voucher
- Jacks or car ramps
- Lots of patience!


I have checked the workshop manual and the instructions were very vague.
I will use as a guide and give the tips that I learned to during my struggle.

Step 1: With the car on the plain level, remove the negative battery cable. Remove then engine cover and the plastic cover on the top of the radiator. Use the clip removal tool.



Step 2: Once the plastic bits are removed, you can have access to the bolts that hold the headlights. Remove both headlights and you will gain more space to work.
(put subtitles on!)

Step 3: recover your air conditioning refrigerant or let the huge leak that “suddenly appeared” get rid of the refrigerant! (I tried to remove the DPF without removing the refrigerant pipe, unfortunately this is not possible! On the bright side… you do not need to remove all pipes as per workshop instructions)
Once you got rid of the refrigerant. Disconnect the pipe in the photo. Wrap the ends in cling film to avoid contamination. Put them aside, you can also unbolt the relay box (yellow) to give more access.

Step 4:
- Remove the turbocharger heat shield (engine must be cold!)
- Remove the clamp holding the DPF tot the turbo ( discard gasket)
- Disconnect the exhaust temperature sensor 1, the differential temperature sensor (using grip pliers) 2 and the O2 sensor (I think)! 3
- Remove the DPF front heat shield



RAISE THE CAR AS YOU NEED ACCESS FROM UNDERNEATH. You must remove the under shield at this

Step 5: (my own trick… not part of the workshop manual instructions)
Unbolt the oil return feed pipe and the clamp. With some wiggle, it will come out. Put in a plastic bag to avoid contamination.

Step 6: With the turbo oil return pipe out of the way. You will have easier access to the bolt and nut that hold the DPF to the engine block. (Right hand side) do the same on the left hand side. If you manage to remove the nuts in red and remove the bracket from underneath the car it will save your with the wiggle to get the DFP out of the engine bay)

Step 7: Go underneath the car and remove the exhaust front pipe (3 nuts) discard the gasket, as it will be deteriorated. *You can buy a new one here: http://tiny.cc/gvtq9y (if you do not buy the kit from Contra as they provide new clamps and gasket)

Step 8: The DPF should be loosen by now. Ask a friend to be underneath the car and have the stronger person from the top of the car. Wear googles for protection as soot and other crap will be falling on the person underneath. Work as a team manoeuvring the DPF out of the way. It is a pain in the arse!

Step 9: Once you have the DPF out remove the brackets and all the sensors.

NOTE: If you bought a replacement from Contra the DPF will be a bit fatter than original one. Do not bother with the middle holding brackets, as they will no longer fit!

Step 10: Remove all the parts from the old DPF that need to go on the new one:
- Sensors
- Brackets
- Holds
- Rear heat shield
Once the DPF is reassembled. Do not overtighten any of the brackets, as you have to align then with the bolts on the engine block.

Step 11: Lower the new DPF to the original with the help of somebody. Replace the gasket in the turbo connector and attach the DPF to the turbo. (do not tighten it fully yet! ).

Step 12: Insert the upper bolts (if your DPF is the same as the original) on the engine block. Replace the turbo oil feed pipe (hand tight it to allow you to move slightly.

Step 13: Re-attach the front heat shield and the brackets (if you are reusing them) Once you put the heat shield bolts you can tight the oil feed pipe and reattach the hose.

Step 14: tighten the DPF to the turbo (Tighten the clamp to 9 N·m (80 lb in)
Connect the exhaust differential pressure sensors ( note! If you used the Contra DPF one of the tubes will be fatter than the original. Use hot water to expand the hose and fit it to the new DPF ( I used a hose clamp as I didn’t have a substitute!)

Step 15: Put the turbo heat shield and reconnect the AC pipe (replace the O-ring seal)

Step 16: once everything is connected, switch on the car to see if everything is working, as it should.
If the car runs as normal replace all the components and the plastic covers.

ALL Done!!! I will update this thread if I remember bits that I forgot to mention.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
You disconnect this clamp underneath the car
 

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What was wrong with the original DPF? If it was choked up the ECU would put the engine into limp mode - no mention made of that.

If the DPF had been gutted (which seems likely if the car was belching black smoke) then it must have been mapped out and, if so, replacing the DPF isn't going to do any good.

When you fit a new DPF you need to programme it into the ECU through diagnostic procedures.
 

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What was wrong with the original DPF? If it was choked up the ECU would put the engine into limp mode - no mention made of that.

If the DPF had been gutted (which seems likely if the car was belching black smoke) then it must have been mapped out and, if so, replacing the DPF isn't going to do any good.

When you fit a new DPF you need to programme it into the ECU through diagnostic procedures.

I already fitted the car was indeed "belching black smoke" .
My car never went to limp mode but it would lose a lot of power whilst discharging the huge black smoke cloud.

The car is perfect now! No black smoke and the power is back when I need it! The only unusual thing that happened was that the DPF light came on after 20 miles or so (next day!) But it was the quickest and smoothest regeneration that I have seen. Driving to work ( 6.9 miles from home), city traffic with only a little stretch of a back road. I little greyish puff and it was done!

So no need to program the DPF on the ECU .
 
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Actually you do need to programme the new DPF into the system but that's OK, you can find out the hard way.

BTW where's the Delta P switch located on yours and how is it connected to the DPF?
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Actually you do need to programme the new DPF into the system but that's OK, you can find out the hard way.

BTW where's the Delta P switch located on yours and how is it connected to the DPF?
Could you elaborate on that? Why do you need to program the DPF to the ECU? There was not mention at all on the workshop manual.

Are you assuming that my car had the DPF deleted and I reinstalled a new one? ( that is not the case)!
 
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Could you elaborate on that? Why do you need to program the DPF to the ECU? There was not mention at all on the workshop manual.

Are you assuming that my car had the DPF deleted and I reinstalled a new one? ( that is not the case)!
No, I'm not assuming anything.

Frst of all tell me, where's the Delta P switch located on yours and how is it connected to the DPF?
 

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No, I'm not assuming anything.

Frst of all tell me, where's the Delta P switch located on yours and how is it connected to the DPF?


There were only three connections that were fed into electronic sensors:



Exhaust differential pressure sensors (2 pipes)
Exhaust temperature sensor X 2 top and bottom of the DPF


Nothing else was connected to it !

No offence, but you better change your tone! You have offered nothing but criticism and now I feel that I am being interrogated!


I am no mechanic, but I did do research on the subject before tackling into it.

DPF are just glorified exhaust pipes with extra measures and expensive materials that the only function is to reduce pollution and harmful emissions.

They are not operated by motors or any kind of mechanical devices. They trap particles... get hot... burn them and release through the exhaust.
The only thing that the ECU does is to manage if the DPF needs to be emptied ( usually when is 80% of its capacity). Then the Computer sends a signal to light the little "fart" dashboard light, informing the driver that you need to regenerate the DPF.

If they fail to regenerate passively, the ECU then tries to raise the temperature of the DPF by injecting extra fuel ( messing up with your consumption and contaminating your oil!)

My car had a DPF which was no longer requiring regeneration because the ****** would just disperse the full load of soot on the cars behind me!

I took the DPF out and put one that actually works! As far as the ECU is aware I replaced nothing. The readings are made on real time as there is no way that the ECU could measure exactly how much was expelled during a regeneration.

Hence my question: WHAT ARE YOU ON ABOUT?
 

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Almost forgot.If you just disconnect the ac pipe as per my instructions, you don't need to replace the seals. My car was re-gassed today and as far as I know there were no leaks
 
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There were only three connections that were fed into electronic sensors:
Exhaust differential pressure sensors (2 pipes)
Exhaust temperature sensor X 2 top and bottom of the DPF

Nothing else was connected to it !

No offence, but you better change your tone! You have offered nothing but criticism and now I feel that I am being interrogated!

I am no mechanic, but I did do research on the subject before tackling into it.

DPF are just glorified exhaust pipes with extra measures and expensive materials that the only function is to reduce pollution and harmful emissions.

They are not operated by motors or any kind of mechanical devices. They trap particles... get hot... burn them and release through the exhaust. The only thing that the ECU does is to manage if the DPF needs to be emptied ( usually when is 80% of its capacity). Then the Computer sends a signal to light the little "fart" dashboard light, informing the driver that you need to regenerate the DPF.

If they fail to regenerate passively, the ECU then tries to raise the temperature of the DPF by injecting extra fuel ( messing up with your consumption and contaminating your oil!)

My car had a DPF which was no longer requiring regeneration because the ****** would just disperse the full load of soot on the cars behind me!

I took the DPF out and put one that actually works! As far as the ECU is aware I replaced nothing. The readings are made on real time as there is no way that the ECU could measure exactly how much was expelled during a regeneration.

Hence my question: WHAT ARE YOU ON ABOUT?
Don’t get stroppy with me, trying to tell me I better do this or that and asking WHAT ARE YOU ON ABOUT? (SHOUTING)

I read your posts and wasn’t clear about a couple of things for example the link you gave for the DPF - although it shows a picture of the short coupled DPF used on the Series 2 Captiva and Antara – when you drill down the company says the one they supply only fits the 2 litre engine which would be the Series 1.

You also have a couple of pictures of an engine bay but one of them certainly doesn’t look like mine hence the reason I asked about the location of the Delta P switch. So when you avoid answering my question I repeated it. What’s your problem with that?

It’s you that needs to change your attitude and stop being so defensive about things.
 

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Don’t get stroppy with me, trying to tell me I better do this or that and asking WHAT ARE YOU ON ABOUT? (SHOUTING)

I read your posts and wasn’t clear about a couple of things for example the link you gave for the DPF - although it shows a picture of the short coupled DPF used on the Series 2 Captiva and Antara – when you drill down the company says the one they supply only fits the 2 litre engine which would be the Series 1.

You also have a couple of pictures of an engine bay but one of them certainly doesn’t look like mine hence the reason I asked about the location of the Delta P switch. So when you avoid answering my question I repeated it. What’s your problem with that?

It’s you that needs to change your attitude and stop being so defensive about things.


Victor, I didn't come to this forum to start arguments. I just wanted to shed a light on this LNQ engines DPF problems. I did my best to put together a tutorial which is 10 x better than the workshop manual. Believe me, is literally 3 or 4 photos.

You said that I need to programme the DPF to the CPU. I asked you why and you did not answer. I didn't ignore your question I sincerely got confused with the terminology that you used.


The contra description changes according the the search. It is indeed for a Captiva or Antara 2.2. Search for the part number: 25184392
They are very helpful and ask for your vin number to ensure that the part fits.

I would like to know the real reason to have the DPF programmed to the ECU as it intrigued me since it did not trigger any check engine lights on my car and it is working perfectly. The only entries that I found that mention that is when you gut the DPF and you have to trick the ECU to carry on without it


Thank you
 
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@gcmarcal - the ECU doesn’t just start a regen based on the Delta P signal, it’s programmed to work out a strategy for regens based on various inputs, not only the differential pressure but also the type of driving the engine goes through eg the number of cold starts, stop/starts, school runs, ambient temperatures, motorway runs with passive regens etc.

As you already know, the Delta P switch reads the differential pressure between the DPF upstream and downstream and sends an output signal voltage to the ECU which anticipates the amount of soot accumulated. A regen doesn’t burn off all the soot in the DPF, there’s always some ash left so as this rises the ECU has to take account of it in scheduling the next regen. As things progress, the ECU continually recalculates its base reference point via the signal from the Delta P switch and factors this into its calculations.

So you had your old DPF which the ECU knew and had built up its strategy based on that but now you’ve changed the DPF which will have a different PD from the previous one. You need to programme the new DPF into the ECU otherwise your regen programme will not work properly and you could get soot build up resulting in complete blockage and a ruined DPF. If you can head over to the OPCOM users forum (you’ll need to give your email address and join) you can read all about it.
 

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@gcmarcal - the ECU doesn’t just start a regen based on the Delta P signal, it’s programmed to work out a strategy for regens based on various inputs, not only the differential pressure but also the type of driving the engine goes through eg the number of cold starts, stop/starts, school runs, ambient temperatures, motorway runs with passive regens etc.

As you already know, the Delta P switch reads the differential pressure between the DPF upstream and downstream and sends an output signal voltage to the ECU which anticipates the amount of soot accumulated. A regen doesn’t burn off all the soot in the DPF, there’s always some ash left so as this rises the ECU has to take account of it in scheduling the next regen. As things progress, the ECU continually recalculates its base reference point via the signal from the Delta P switch and factors this into its calculations.

So you had your old DPF which the ECU knew and had built up its strategy based on that but now you’ve changed the DPF which will have a different PD from the previous one. You need to programme the new DPF into the ECU otherwise your regen programme will not work properly and you could get soot build up resulting in complete blockage and a ruined DPF. If you can head over to the OPCOM users forum (you’ll need to give your email address and join) you can read all about it.
Thanks for the info. I will have a look on that info. But to be honest I won't be worrying too much about that. When I received the DPF they sent me some (generic)instructions. One of them as just to ensure that you cleared any codes, the only one that had me puzzled was to reset the ash value to "0".


As I found no mention of that in either workshops ( Antara and Captiva). I thought: Meh! It could not get worse than it is with the black smoke.

I would be worried if my car as newer full of computer modules and not a 7 years old Chevy. My ECU is probably on I don't give a FOOK mode as I drove from Norwich to France (expelling tons of soot.

Based on that putting an used DPF is a huge risk as you could never know how much ash is inside.


I have already a plan for the future to wash my dpf without removing it completely ( I will use the old one to find the pipes that fit) Maybe will be another tutorial in 4 or 5 years! devil:
 
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Update. My DPF light came on in September, had to drive roughly 30 miles for it to disappear.
Came back on again last week. Strangely I took a gamble giving a lift to a friend o my wife ( 2 miles from my place) driving in the city on a hill on second and third gear. After driving home using the longest rout possible (8 to 10 mile) the light was gone again! ;)
 

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GC, I was rather surprised that it only took 30 miles to 'clear' your DPF on one occasion and 10 miles on another. I suspect all you are doing is clearing 'just enough' to modify the flow and remove the light illumination.
DPF's usually need a good 30 minutes on an open road at 2500 to 3000 rpm. Remember that progressively the resultant ash from the carbon burn procedure will begin to fill up available space in the DPF
Cooler weather makes regenerations are more likely because of the cooling effect under the vehicle. The DPF has a minimum heat temperature to trigger the burn.
 

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GC, I was rather surprised that it only took 30 miles to 'clear' your DPF on one occasion and 10 miles on another. I suspect all you are doing is clearing 'just enough' to modify the flow and remove the light illumination.
DPF's usually need a good 30 minutes on an open road at 2500 to 3000 rpm. Remember that progressively the resultant ash from the carbon burn procedure will begin to fill up available space in the DPF
Cooler weather makes regenerations are more likely because of the cooling effect under the vehicle. The DPF has a minimum heat temperature to trigger the burn.
IT should not have been completely full as last weekend I had travelled to Spalding and did a good run! 140 miles
 

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IT should not have been completely full as last weekend I had travelled to Spalding and did a good run! 140 miles
In which case just watch the frequency of the demanded Regenerations. It might not be full with Soot, but it might just be gradually becoming full of 'ash'. Ash is not expelled so therefore it gradually consumes the space that the soot would normally be retained for burning. Hence the regeneration capability for burning soot is diminished over time creating more and more frequent regenerations.
.
 
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