Chevrolet Owners Club banner
1 - 20 of 45 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

My Captiva is ald just 7 monts, bur I had alreday problems with DPF filter.

After 10.000km, filter was clogged so much that I cold not strart the engine.

In chevrolet service they took it out clean and invoice me for 150‚¬!

What is strange that, lamp for signalisation of this problem was not swiched on!

Is there anyone, who can advice me about this?

Thanks in advance!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
As far as i'm aware the orange dpf light should come on when the dpf is seventy per cent clogged, so it seems like you may have a faulty sensor.
If it was me I would behankering for a free repair under warranty on the grounds that the dpf sensor was faulty.

Infact anything connected to that flaming item I would be argueing to the nth degree.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Just get the DPF and CAT removed once this is done the car needs a re-map. You never have big bills again. My 2011 LTZ had this done over 1 year ago. The car goes far better and gets better MPG.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Easy way is to take the dpf off knock a hole through and then the sensor at the front will read the same has the back sensor and it will never block again and you still have the cat which is before the dpf .proved and tested and cheap......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
I would be interested to know what the warranty and insurance implications would be after dpf removal.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,470 Posts
Probably negate warranty (if still covered); insurance maybe void unless you inform insurer of the 'modification'. More to the point what aboutthe MOT implications (possible fail?) and with increased CO2 the vehicle may well end up in a higher taxation class!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,470 Posts
Birdrock, It sure can! Look at the taxation table for class L & M. New registrations Class M is £1,030 per year (first year regn).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Tax is only rated when the vehicle is new, therefore it is impossibe to increase or decrease the tax code. I have told my insurance about the modification, this did slightly load the policy, I am sorry but I cannot tell you how much as I have a fleet policy for my 5 cars. It would only be my engine which could have warranty problems, however since I no longer put the sludge caused by re-generation back into the sump, this is not a problem, unlike those people who have had to get new engines because of the increased sump oil causing the engine to hydraulic. AS for MOTs, diesels are tested differently fro petrols, they only have to pass a smoke test. If my car fails on this test I can simply re-fit the DPF and CAT. It is npt breaking the law removong a CAT from a diesel, it is however breaking the law to remove the CAT from a petol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
997 Posts
My car sailed through it's MOT without the DPF in place, so no worries on that count!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
652 Posts
Well done bigiainw, glad to hear that...


but as we have all commented on these crude DPFs for soooo long, just to balance this.



A guy in work is now facing a £1000 + bill to refit his. He did the same thing in his Mazda 6, and it just failed its first MoT on emissions. They stated the emissions was far too high for the car and year. To be fair the garage was a little surprised that the emissions where so high, even without the DPF on such a low mileage young car, but they suspect a badly remapped ECU as part of the DPF removal was to blame. They put the car on a diagnosis reader, and have identified 100s of codes that have been logged but hacked so they don't flash the MIL. They suspect that the MIL would NEVER illuminate, and suspect the remapping of the ECU as a real bodge. They said his Mazda 6 now has the electronics of a 1970s diesel, ie. none...



His only option is to get the DPF refitted and the ECU re-flashed by Mazda back to its factory settings.



As I have said over and over... I'm sure there are 100s of competent fitters out there who can remove and fabricate pipes to remove a DPF, but I'm not sure I would trust them with re-writing the ECU program code.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
476 Posts
Why did he go back to Mazda to have the original put back,if you deal with people that know what they are doing they can put it back to original. Mine had been remapped previous to the DPF removal so they put it back to original, removed the internals of the DPF refitted it so everything looks original, slipped a blanking plate into the manifold of the EGR valve to get rid of that troublesome critter and remapped the two items out of the ECU. Car is running sweet as a nut, goes faster than a fast thing going fast.Also no bother with getting anMOT, insurance can not tell its gone,noFuel in sump, no added riskof knackered engines and turbo, no regenerations or paying for forced regenerations, no driving up and down motorways clearing codes, no calls for extra oil changes andnot laying out about a grand when it eventually needs replacing. so while some of you out there aresuffering you're DPF's and watering down your engines life blood I haven't looked back as my DPF and its problems is just a bad memory.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
652 Posts
I didn't say he had gone back to or had to get Mazda to refit the DPF, I said the garage recommended he went to Mazda to get the "stock" ECU re-flashed.


The garage (independent) that did his MOT said they didn't want to refit the DPF because they didn't have the parts to do so. They suggested he contacted the company who removed the DPF for that. But they have suggested he goes to Mazda for the ECU re-flash, as the company who removed the DPF made a complete "bo!!ox" of the ECU remapping the first time. Apparently no codes are getting through to the ECU and reported as a fault. The ECU change they made is just "storing" the codes and not acting on them.



The question I put to anyone considering this, or have had it done. How do you know if your ECU has been bodged. Can someone give me an 100% guaranteed way of checking that...



Guys a simple analogy.. If your fuel warning light keeps coming on, do you :-



a) Put more fuel in the car

b) Take the bulb out, it wont light anymore

c) Ignore it and see if it goes away





I don't like the DPF, I think it is a very crude solution to what is an European legislation problem, but I still wont trust a mechanic out to make a buck to reprogramme a very complex piece of code.



I've said before (on other threads). I've been in the IT industry for over 25 years now, starting as a programmer, through to a senior consultant for a world leading db company, to now a Programme Manager for a world leading ICT organisation. That experience tells me that the hardest thing to do, is to change or modify existing programme code, especially without the original documentation. That code then needs to be tested to ensure that no changes make impact the function of the core and that the changes are fit for purpose.



This wiki page gives Testing in a nutshell... (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_testing).



I don't expect you will read it, probably wont get past the opening sentence or two, and why should you. But I do hope it starts to illustrate why I would not allow these guys to hack my ECU code. There is no way, they test their changes, they just hope it will work, and a golden rule of thumb in the IT industry, is you cannot write 10 lines of code without human error introducing a bug. In my years of experience, I'd half that industry edict.



Chevrolet (GM) would have spent years developing and testing the ECU code and it will still have bugs in it (I bet). So thinking these guys can just open it up on their PCs and within an hour or so make coding changes to remove all reference to the DPF in such a way that it doesn't impact any other of the ECU parameters is, in my opinion, reckless....



If they hack it in the same way as my colleague had is Mazda hacked, then you could be in for a stack of problems to come.



By the way, my colleague is also a programmer, and his first words to me was "what was I thinking"...



Anyone who still wants to get his DPF removed and ECU remapped, good luck.... Its your choice really.







----------

Just a footnote, as someone is bound to say they had ECU remaps before for performance and consumption reasons with no problem. They are slightly different, as they don't change CODE but parameter settings, so the code (ECU) performs exactly the same (programmatic wise) only with different tolerances.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
652 Posts
Sorry guys wasn't trying to be the authority on those, just I feel the DPF removal argument only ever shows me side. That is do it, there is no downside. I just wanted to put a little balance on this so an informed decision can be taken by those who haven't a clue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
997 Posts
I take your point and i appreciate your take on this. That's what the forum's about for me, an exchange of views where you might just learn something. I have to say that based on your argument, I'm not going to rush out and have mine refitted, but that doesn't mean that you're wrong. It doesn't mean that I'm wrong either. It just means that we think differently and that we're allowed to make up our own minds.
And that's a good thing.

Just look at the coalition government....
 
1 - 20 of 45 Posts
Top