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Ever get frustrated because you don’t have the right tool for the job? My 2.2 turbo diesel Antara (same engine as the Captiva) is coming up on 5 years old and seemed to be running rough occasionally but no warning lights or fault codes showing so thought I’d take the EGR valve off and clean it just in case.

Got started OK, removed the engine cover, odd wiring harnesses etc and the pipe that runs from the vacuum pump over the brake servo but there’s a couple of fuel pipes which would need to come off. Couldn’t find my tool for disconnecting the push lock pipe fittings so had to put it all back together again. Need to get onto Ebay and order a set of QR tools and make sure they’re small enough to fit since there’s not much room to get in - see pic2

EGR Valve 1.jpg
EGR  valve 2.jpg
 

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I feel your frustration . B*gg*r (or whatever word you use up there in Scotland!)
 

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I normally use words related to burger and …king Ed but I need to learn some choice Gaelic phrases so I can let rip with impunity. It was bl**dy cold when I was working outside, as Billy Connolly says there’s only two seasons in Scotland, June and winter. Might leave round 2 until next month.
 

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Yes!!!! Whole interwebs have been waiting for this. Will do mine once you show us how.
 

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Can't understand why no one's done it before now (or at least never posted anything) it seems simple enough to me. I'd like to blank it off completely and get it mapped out of the ECU but that's not possible with the Covid 19 lockdown going on. I might just fit one of those plates with the hole in the middle to at least partially blank it off, see how that does.
 

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Can't understand why no one's done it before now (or at least never posted anything) it seems simple enough to me. I'd like to blank it off completely and get it mapped out of the ECU but that's not possible with the Covid 19 lockdown going on. I might just fit one of those plates with the hole in the middle to at least partially blank it off, see how that does.

I see posts asking about it and they never update if they managed it. I failed to find any videos in how to do it properly. I found almost everything from transfer box mods to how to repair injectors...
If your experiment blanking it won't cause any issues I shall do on mine as well :)
 

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I tried to remove mine without disconnecting the pipe, but unfortunately it is seized, I cannot move it more than 1 mm. Also I saw that some cooling liquid came out after I tried to disconnect, so I got scared and I put it back. Is it normal to have cooling leaks when trying to take the EGR out? I saw a hose attached to the flange that could be for cooling, but I think this should be isolated...

Are you sure you have to disconnect that hose? I thought that it will come out with some wiggle.
 

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Hi everyone. I will take you up on the invitation to post my series of failed attempts to deal with EGR issues. Brief summary, I got my 2012 LTZ Captiva used, and the guy evidently got me fooled. The check engine started lighting soon thereafter, and then the car began to go into Limp mode (luckily, allowing me to keep driving on the freeway, as opposed to slowing me down to 30 KMH). I have been dealing with this mess for over 8 months, now. Got a quote from a non-opel/chevy shop for 2.300 EUR, for the replacement of the Throttle Body, Inlet Manifold and EGR valve.

I figured "Nah, it sounds like something I can do myself", and began my research. I was actually able to secure a copy of the Workshop manual, and thought I had struck gold! I tried just doing what Victor is trying to do, just removing the valve by unscrewing those three torx screws (35s, I think they are) and pulling upwards... it will not work... That thing has a gasket/seal, that makes it nearly impossible (for me) to remove. I have tried banging softly on the aluminum part with a rubber mallet, tried spraying it with that screw shock rewmover.... nothing.

So, I decided I would follow the instructions to remove the whole intercooler, so I could gain access to the Throttle Body itself and, since I'd already be there, take down the inlet manifold and give it a thorough wash....

The manual shows these wonderfully easy schematics, where everything makes sense, so I had my hopes all the way through the roof. What the f*cking manual does NOT tell you, is that everything you need to do to take down the intercooler, and all the rest, happens in a nearly inaccessible place, at the BACK of the engine, where you are always cramming your fingers between the engine and the firewall.

Also, the stupid intercooler is held in place by two (or maybe just one, I couldn't really figure it out in the end) where you cannot fit a wrench, without having to unscrew the injectors...

I literally took down the battery, the fuse box (left side of the car, facing forward), the ECU unit, the engine coolant tank, just to try and get access to the places I needed to get to. On top of the engine you need to take down the fuel rail system, that fuel line that Victor was talking about (for which I think I damaged the clamping mechanism a bit, need to make sure no leaks come out when I restart the engine), and a bunch of weirdly positioned hoses.

I am not a mechanic by trade, but I am also not entirely inept at it (what took me about 4 hours to take appart, I was able to rebuild in about 1,5 Hours...) but I finally had to give up (with the hardest, strongest and deepest feeling of frustration I have ever experienced in my time as a DIY mechanic) and had to call a different workshop that recently helped a friend of mine, and seems to be a bit cheaper than the one that provided the quote.

IN SUMMARY: 1) Taking out the EGR valve alone, is very hard. I have read more posts here and reviews elsewhere saying that they were NOT able to pull it out, than any ever saying that they did... (Victor, I hope this is not your case, I'd love to be vicariously happy for you); 2) Trying to take out the EGR intercooler is incredibly tough; 3) Anything that has to do with cleaning the throttle body, inlet manifold etc, on this car, will have to be done by taking it nearly all apart... don't even think about those cleaners with the long hoses and nozzles that you can spray into the TB and Inlet Man. while the car is running, because there is no way your car will be able to run if you have access to that section.

There, that is my sob story. Hope it helps someone. I still feel I was so close to being successful I could almost taste victory, and that only fuels my frustration even more...

Have a great day, all of you. And may everyone on Earth be super happy (except for the team of engineers who came up with that engine design... onto them, I wish nothing short of the seven plagues of Egypt...) :)
 

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I feel your pain! The workshop manual is unrealistic oversimplified.
I struggled with the DPF removal and replacing my Transfer box.

They even had the wrong illustrations on it.
 

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Rombs, Such an enlightening and elegant presentation of total frustration! Be warned everybody.

I chickened out on doing mine. Eventually the vehicle went in for the throttle body replacement (diagnosed as failure) and as they were going to do that, I had the ERG cleaned at the same time as it seemed a prudent and logical thing to do while they were 90% of the way there at the throttle body.
It turned out that the throttle body wasnt defective at all. All that had failed was the gasket had burnt through on one side. (I have a post on the forum with photos of the throttle body). Throttle body was under Warranty (Warrantywise) and I paid the extra for the EGR clean.

Long gone are the days of when you could open the engine bonnet, semi sit in the engine bay to work on the engine. Now you can hardly get a hand or wrist into a space and retract it without losing skin off your knuckles.

What we have to remember is we are dealing with bits of metal. Can you imagine a surgeon doing an operation on a patient for the first time after having done the 'book learning' only to run into the same horror frustrations that it isnt quite how they described in in the text books!
.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I tried to remove mine without disconnecting the pipe, but unfortunately it is seized, I cannot move it more than 1 mm. Also I saw that some cooling liquid came out after I tried to disconnect, so I got scared and I put it back. Is it normal to have cooling leaks when trying to take the EGR out? I saw a hose attached to the flange that could be for cooling, but I think this should be isolated...
Are you sure you have to disconnect that hose? I thought that it will come out with some wiggle.
Yes, the coolant needs drained off at least half way down, probably clamp off the pipe from the overflow bottle and drain it straight off the rad. It only needs drained to the point where the coolant level in the rad is lower than the EGR cooler to stop it leaking out when the EGR valve is removed.

As regards the fuel pipe, maybe you’re right and the EGR valve would come out but I’d prefer to take both of those fuel pipes out of the way.
 

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Hi everyone. I will take you up on the invitation to post my series of failed attempts to deal with EGR issues. Brief summary, I got my 2012 LTZ Captiva used, and the guy evidently got me fooled. The check engine started lighting soon thereafter, and then the car began to go into Limp mode (luckily, allowing me to keep driving on the freeway, as opposed to slowing me down to 30 KMH). I have been dealing with this mess for over 8 months, now. Got a quote from a non-opel/chevy shop for 2.300 EUR, for the replacement of the Throttle Body, Inlet Manifold and EGR valve.

I figured "Nah, it sounds like something I can do myself", and began my research. I was actually able to secure a copy of the Workshop manual, and thought I had struck gold! I tried just doing what Victor is trying to do, just removing the valve by unscrewing those three torx screws (35s, I think they are) and pulling upwards... it will not work... That thing has a gasket/seal, that makes it nearly impossible (for me) to remove. I have tried banging softly on the aluminum part with a rubber mallet, tried spraying it with that screw shock rewmover.... nothing.

So, I decided I would follow the instructions to remove the whole intercooler, so I could gain access to the Throttle Body itself and, since I'd already be there, take down the inlet manifold and give it a thorough wash....

The manual shows these wonderfully easy schematics, where everything makes sense, so I had my hopes all the way through the roof. What the f*cking manual does NOT tell you, is that everything you need to do to take down the intercooler, and all the rest, happens in a nearly inaccessible place, at the BACK of the engine, where you are always cramming your fingers between the engine and the firewall.

Also, the stupid intercooler is held in place by two (or maybe just one, I couldn't really figure it out in the end) where you cannot fit a wrench, without having to unscrew the injectors...

I literally took down the battery, the fuse box (left side of the car, facing forward), the ECU unit, the engine coolant tank, just to try and get access to the places I needed to get to. On top of the engine you need to take down the fuel rail system, that fuel line that Victor was talking about (for which I think I damaged the clamping mechanism a bit, need to make sure no leaks come out when I restart the engine), and a bunch of weirdly positioned hoses.

I am not a mechanic by trade, but I am also not entirely inept at it (what took me about 4 hours to take appart, I was able to rebuild in about 1,5 Hours...) but I finally had to give up (with the hardest, strongest and deepest feeling of frustration I have ever experienced in my time as a DIY mechanic) and had to call a different workshop that recently helped a friend of mine, and seems to be a bit cheaper than the one that provided the quote.

IN SUMMARY: 1) Taking out the EGR valve alone, is very hard. I have read more posts here and reviews elsewhere saying that they were NOT able to pull it out, than any ever saying that they did... (Victor, I hope this is not your case, I'd love to be vicariously happy for you); 2) Trying to take out the EGR intercooler is incredibly tough; 3) Anything that has to do with cleaning the throttle body, inlet manifold etc, on this car, will have to be done by taking it nearly all apart... don't even think about those cleaners with the long hoses and nozzles that you can spray into the TB and Inlet Man. while the car is running, because there is no way your car will be able to run if you have access to that section.

There, that is my sob story. Hope it helps someone. I still feel I was so close to being successful I could almost taste victory, and that only fuels my frustration even more...

Have a great day, all of you. And may everyone on Earth be super happy (except for the team of engineers who came up with that engine design... onto them, I wish nothing short of the seven plagues of Egypt...) :)
I reckon to remove the EGR valve it would need to be sprayed with penetrant and twisted back and forth to get it freed off. I don’t think you’d get in with an ordinary strap wrench (kind you use for oil filters) or even the angled filter pliers but I had a strap wrench I made out of a ½” bolt and an old timing belt which would do the trick. Just wrap it round the valve body, get a socket onto the bolt and twist it one way then the other. Trouble is I can’t find that tool either although it must be quite a few years ago since I last used it.

No doubt it’s a big job to take out the whole EGR cooler. I think I’d suspend the engine on a hoist, remove all the mountings and pull the engine forward to get access to the back. One thing for sure it WILL come out even if you need to take a 14lb hammer to the bulkhead to get some clearance!
 

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Ever get frustrated because you don’t have the right tool for the job? My 2.2 turbo diesel Antara (same engine as the Captiva) is coming up on 5 years old and seemed to be running rough occasionally but no warning lights or fault codes showing so thought I’d take the EGR valve off and clean it just in case.

Got started OK, removed the engine cover, odd wiring harnesses etc and the pipe that runs from the vacuum pump over the brake servo but there’s a couple of fuel pipes which would need to come off. Couldn’t find my tool for disconnecting the push lock pipe fittings so had to put it all back together again. Need to get onto Ebay and order a set of QR tools and make sure they’re small enough to fit since there’s not much room to get in - see pic2

View attachment 1506
View attachment 1507
Hi Victor, I made 2 tools out of plastic battery terminal covers and they did the trick with the fuel pipes. Ones more difficult than the other due to a sharp bend in the pipe but they worked OK. Unfortunately I threw them away when I`d finished with them but easy to make and the pipes come apart easily. I`d gladly have sent them to you if I still had them but I know you`re more than capable of making them yourself. Good luck, Howard.
 
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