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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Thanks all!

We do have full break down cover which I took out just before this trip, so I am umming and ahhing about getting towed back home. Do you genuinely think if we drove it all that way we could do alot more damage?

The garage had the car for an hour yesterday and said "we'll not charge you for checking th3 diagnostics again"- I would bloody think not!!

In the end they threw alot of jargon at me and I didn't really understand any if it!! They said they think the reason it lost power again was that the car "freaked out" as we'd probably switched off and interrupted a regen??? But when it lost power we were cruising along as normal, which is when it died last time. Something about ecg or something and dps, exhaust heating up. I have no idea. I asked if he thought this would happen again and he said no.

I phoned our mechanic at home to tell him what they said and he reckons what they've said it's possible but unlikely and sounds like they're hoping we'll get away up the motorway before it happens again and then we're not their problem!!

Going to fill up with vpower today. I have no idea about anything other than screen wash when looking under the bonnet so I daren't mess on with injector cleaner!!! I was going to let my usual mechanic tackle that when we got home!

As for this happening due to running out of fuel, it could be up to 2 months since that happened (my perception of time since having our 3rd child in June is way out and days blend into each other now!!!), would something happening that long ago suddenly start this trouble now?

Looking to trade this car in for something else as soon as we get home now. Absolutely loved my Captiva until it started with this mischief :-(
 

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Several interesting points in your feedback. Not charging you for further diagnostics - fine - but you havent said you have the results. You've paid for them so get the print out so that you know (helpful for us) but also for your garage when you get back home.
Repeatedly interrupting regenerations will result in the vehicle going into 'limp home mode' but you've not indicated to us that you have failed to complete regenerations or there has been DPF illumination on dash.
A blocked DPF (diesel particulate filter) might be cause especially if it is blocked with ash which is the by-product of the soot burn off. Use of incorrect engine oil will contribute to this.
Incorrect engine oil will also contribute to EGR (exhaust gas recirculation) valve getting 'gummed up' too.

Total loss of power would seem to imply fuel starvation but of course the engine management computer might cut this back as a means of 'self protection' to avoid further damage. To lose power cruising could be the fuel filters being blocked to the extent that the throttle demand exceeds the capable volume of fuel feed. Your running out of fuel and sucking in tank debris may have simply been the catalyst weeks ago and once blocking starts additional debris soon backs up.

It might be a simple case of the fuel tank not self venting and in effect causing a fuel tank vacuum. Might be worth leaving the locking fuel cap off and buying a cheap rubber cap with an air breather hole as an experiment.

It could be something as simple as a lose wire connector making intermittent contact could also be a reason.

The reality is the possible reason(s) could be anyone of several possibilities.

As for injector cleaner - there's nothing complicated about undoing the cap on a bottle and pouring it into the fuel tank! I'm tempted to say that a bottle of DPF cleaner might be worth doing as well especially at the mileage of the vehicle. If your use of the vehicle (with a family) has been only short around town type driving then DPF cleaner is helpful anyway.

As for trading the vehicle in - all modern vehicles are complex and there is no saying that any other make would be trouble free either, so dont have a knee jerk reaction just because of this unfortunate event especially as it is a vehicle you like and suits your family requirements.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·


This is all we got from the garage.

So can I buy injector cleaner from a garage and just put it in where I put the fuel?

The service light has come on again this morning so back to the garage, again!!!!!
 

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MrsB, nice quick response thanks. Code P0202 is injector code, doesnt list any others but I expect there were which they state they cleared.Interesting that copy of invoice states low fuel pressure. Replacing injector will not resolve low fuel pressure. No comment about replacing fuel filters which is probably the first thing I would have done especially considering the earlier event of running out of fuel possibly sucking in debris. (which I hope you told them about as every clue helps diagnosis).
EML lamp on again could be almost anything as it is a 'warning' to get something attended to.

Personally after these events and as you have Breakdown Home recovery I would seriously consider getting taken home. Repair while vehicle still running may only be £hundreds whereas to risk total engine damage will be £thousands. Dont be afraid of the embarrassment of trailer recovery. You've paid for the cover so just treat it as an experience riding in the cab of a recovery truck (the children will love that!) You dont say where in UK you are but if you are unsure where your nearest Chevrolet service dealer is (they will have the technical know how and access to GM data base) you can register on www.mychevrolet.eu (for free) and look up the service dealer near your home.

Good Luck, safe journey back which ever option you take.

Ed

ps: I've been thinking more as to the low fuel pressure entry. Filters and maybe the fuel pumps are where I'd look. If the fuel pumps were damaged by 'over working' trying to provide fuel when you ran out (previously) then that's a possibility. That's what happened to mine when my high pressure rail failed. The pumps were damaged trying to make up the pressure supply.


Edited by: Aussie Ed
 

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mrsB1987 said:



So can I buy injector cleaner from a garage and just put it in where I put the fuel?

YES.
Both DPF cleaner and Injector cleaner go in the fuel filler (preferably when you put fuel in so it is mixed). I would be tempted to try the DPF cleaner first as the troublesome injector has been replaced.
 

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P0202 indicates that its a standard obd2 code, most likely a generic read, but it could also been a GM specific reader.The workshop should have swapped the injector from cylinder 4 to any other cylinder, if the injector was bad the fault code would most likely clear on cylinder 4 and move to the switched cylinder. cylinder #1,2,3.
if fault code moves its most likely the injector if it still trows code on cylinder 4 its most likely something else, like bad connector or cabling to injector.
It can also be a bad connection in far end on connector going in to ecu.

Your mechanic can perform above test.

Edited by: A-Man
 

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I would agree with all points above, DPF cleaner is a good idea but will take quite a few miles to show results. I do not think the garage has , or is going to sort out your problem in the short term. Not replacing the fuel filter with these faults is um silly on their part.

As above use the recovery, maybe run the car for a few miles with the Vpower and DPF cleaner (added to the tank following instructions on the can) if it seems to go better, well and good, if not -recover.

By the way, I have only found DPF cleaner in moto-factors in my part of the country.
Halfauds seems to stock the Wynns one for £10.

<h2 style="margin: 10px 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 1.2em; line-height: inherit; font-family: arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: line; color: rgb0, 0, 0;">Wynn's Diesel Particulate Filter Cleaner</h2><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 12px; line-height: inherit; font-family: arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: line;">Wynn's Diesel Particulate Filter Cleaner[/B]gives your diesel engine the shake up it needs. This chemical treatment reduces soot emissions, regenerates the particulate filter and gives that engine of yours a good all-round spring clean. Resulting in lower fuel consumption and the avoidance of regular maintanence costs, Wynn's cleaner is the one to go for.<h2 style="margin: 10px 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 1.2em; line-height: inherit; font-family: arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: line; color: rgb0, 0, 0;">Wynn's Diesel Particulate Filter Cleaner Extra Info</h2><ul style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 12px; line-height: inherit; font-family: arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: line; list-style: disc;"><li style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 20px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: line; list-style: disc;">Clears and regenerates blocked soot filters without dismantling<li style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 20px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: line; list-style: disc;">Complete burn-off of soot particles during driving<li style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 20px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: line; list-style: disc;">Avoids frequent maintenance costs related to the manual regeneration of the blocked soot filter<li style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 20px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: line; list-style: disc;">Especially suited for city driving cycles<li style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 20px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: line; list-style: disc;">Can be used in combination with built-in regeneration systems<li style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 20px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: line; list-style: disc;">Ultra-fast result[/list]<br style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px;"><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 12px; line-height: inherit; font-family: arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: line;">Ideally used with<u style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: line;">Wynn's Injector Cleaner[/u][/B]

All the best on your travels.
 

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P0202 seems to be cylinder 2 not 4 according to several resources on the web.https://www.obd-codes.com/p0202
https://www.autocodes.com/p0202_chevrolet.html

I wonder how the discovered "fuel pressure low" that is stated on the invoice.
If they checked the pressure and it indicated low on one cylinder the statement is most likely correct.
But the fuel pressure can originate from other reasons then bad injector circuit, like bad fuel line to injector.



I still don't get the P0202 right, its not a code for cylinder 4, maybe someone can correct me if am wrong.
 

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https://www.yourmechanic.com/article/p0202-obd-ii-trouble-code-injector-circuit-malfunction-cylinder-2-by-spencer-clayton

Above page contains following statement.

<h3 style="-sizing: border-; font-family: proxima-nova, Avenir, Helvetica-Neue, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 26px; color: rgb55, 61, 81; margin: 45px 0px 15px; font-size: 22px; : rgb250, 251, 252;">Common mistakes when diagnosing the P0202 code</h3>Mistakes when repairing and diagnosing the vehicle can be costly and can waste valuable time and money. Care should be taken when performing diagnosis to follow all steps in their entirety and in the correct order. <b style="">The injector circuit must be fully tested before the fuel injector is replaced to make sure there are no other faults.[/B]As i said before, one test can be simply switch the injector with another cylinder, if bad injector the code would clear and show up on the cylinder it was switched to.If bad harness, the code will remain on same cylinder and the injector originating from that cylinder is most likely100% functional.
But since we don't know maybe this is not a electrical problem at all, and discovered to be a an issue caused by bad fuel pressure.
 

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A-Man said:
https://www.yourmechanic.com/article/p0202-obd-ii-trouble-code-injector-circuit-malfunction-cylinder-2-by-spencer-clayton

But since we don't know maybe this is not a electrical problem at all, and discovered to be a an issue caused by bad fuel pressure.
Depends on whether you're talking about Low Pressure (LP) or High Pressure. On the LP side the electric pump initially runs to provide fuerl to the LP side of the Engine Driven Pump (EDP) usually at around 30 to 60 psi. Once the engine has started the electric pump switches off and the EDP draws the fuel up itself and maintains enough pressure to supply the HP side of the EDP..
The HP side of the EDP supplies fuel to the Common Rail at something like 200 bar for cranking, 300 bar for isling and 1200 to 2000 bar when running. A faulty injector Ieg worn needle, nozzle and/or seals will allow fuel to leak past and return to the tank (often referred to as the "leak off"), Excessive leak-off will cause the common-rail pressure to drop. Worn injector(s) are the most common reason for low CRD pressure.
 

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But in this case its not caused by a faulty injector, if the replaced the correct cylinder?
 

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I had a similar problem.

I had to stop and start it about four times in total - the last time being the long hill on the m20 leading up to the m25. whenever I felt the power loss and heard the ping, I cruised onto the hard shoulder, turned off the engine, counted ten and off I went again.

it seems fine now thoughEdited by: MisterB1959
 

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In the process of replacing my fuel filter (2010), I hope the one on the OP's is easier to do than the 2.0l. What an absolute pig of a job....Mine was black and no evidence that it had been replaced @ 76000.
 

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A-Man said:
I still don't get the P0202 right, its not a code for cylinder 4, maybe someone can correct me if am wrong.

Well spotted A-Man. All my listings also show cylinder 2 and not cylinder 4.
So the puzzle exists as to whether they actually replaced the correct injector ??!!


It is a pity we dont have the 'other codes' they cleared off.

I'm still placing my bets on fuel issue . According to MrsB descriptions it is stated the vehicle 'stops'. Even with a defective injector surely it would still run even though it may be like a 'misfire'.
 

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A-Man said:
But in this case its not caused by a faulty injector, if the replaced the correct cylinder?
I'm not being drawn into guessing what the fault is with this vehicle, too many details missing in the story. I'm making the distinction between the LP and HP sides of the fuel system when the term 'low fuel pressure' is being quoted.
 

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MisterB1959 said:
where is the fuel filter located? do you have photos?
The fuel filter on the Series 1 Antara / Captiva is located next to the bulkhead. On the Cruze and Orlando it's located at the rear of the car, under a skid plate just forward of the offside rear wheel.
 

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Victor said:
MisterB1959 said:
where is the fuel filter located? do you have photos?
The fuel filter on the Series 1 Antara / Captiva is located next to the bulkhead. On the Cruze and Orlando it's located at the rear of the car, under a skid plate just forward of the offside rear wheel.

Victor, Correct me if I'm wrong. On the Series 2 Captiva fuel filters are located differently to the Series 1. On the Series 2 they are underside of the chassis and a twin cartridge body.
See link:-https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2ugJMh_P_8
 

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Yes, you're right Ed, the Series 2 has twin filters which are located as shown in the video. There's also a white plastic screw in the housing to drain any water out if it accumulates and triggers the warning light. The filter housing also contains a fuel heater.

btw there's a couple of Antara owners have reported their filter housings corroded through and had to be replaced.
 

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To the OP - perhaps a fuel filter change at a cost of around £25 (not including labour!) might be worth trying??? Edited by: MisterB1959
 
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