Chevrolet Owners Club banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi there, I need help! Captiva Diesel 2010. The oil service light has come on, I reset it since the oil level was ok. After a couple of months again it come on and... the level of oil has increased!. Is this an indicator that diesel has gone into the oil? I ask at the service and they do not know.
Shall I change the oil and filter again (mayor service done in February).
I was reading previous discussions and seems that short journeys could be the problem? What shall I do? I can't drive it like this.
Thanks in advance!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
694 Posts
Peti said:
Hi there, I need help! Captiva Diesel 2010. The oil service light has come on, I reset it since the oil level was ok. After a couple of months again it come on and... the level of oil has increased!. Is this an indicator that diesel has gone into the oil? I ask at the service and they do not know. Shall I change the oil and filter again (mayor service done in February).
I was reading previous discussions and seems that short journeys could be the problem? What shall I do? I can't drive it like this. Thanks in advance!
Yes and Yes again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
406 Posts
The DPF regeneration process injects an extra load of diesel during the exhaust stroke of a cylinder. This is meant to combust as it travels from the manifold to the DPF and cause heating of the DPF which in turn allows the soot build up to be reduced to ash.

As I understand it, if you stop the engine mid-regen then this diesel is dumped in the cylinders and drains past the rings to end up in the sump.

I am not aware of any other way the diesel can end up there but it is surprising how much affect this can have. Firstly it causes a problem of thinning and diluting the oil making it a much worse lubricant. It if gets really bad then eventually the car can start to pick up oil from the sump and burn it - diesel runaway
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
T5NEL said:
The DPF regeneration process injects an extra load of diesel during the exhaust stroke of a cylinder. This is meant to combust as it travels from the manifold to the DPF and cause heating of the DPF which in turn allows the soot build up to be reduced to ash.

As I understand it, if you stop the engine mid-regen then this diesel is dumped in the cylinders and drains past the rings to end up in the sump.

I am not aware of any other way the diesel can end up there but it is surprising how much affect this can have. Firstly it causes a problem of thinning and diluting the oil making it a much worse lubricant. It if gets really bad then eventually the car can start to pick up oil from the sump and burn it - diesel runaway
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Correct in a nutshell. So if you do lots of short runs in winter [ school runs twice a day with grand kids] itinvolveswasted fuel and never ending re-gens in aengine destroying circle, I made the decision to have the DPF removed seven years ago and 100% do not regret it, but everybody has to make there own decisions and live with them no mater what the scare mongers throw at you . I also have seven years of MOT's from different MOT centres all with 100% clear emissions, and to my knowledge there has beenno fines or prosecutionsunless anybody can highlight one out to me. Anyway that's my view, I have broad shoulders and I am now putting my fingers in my ears, Al.

Edited by: bel
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
Does the DPF delete prevent any type of regen at all then. From a software point of view that is. Have you still retained the catalytic converter?I tend to um lose both the cat and the EGR on diesels (not sure how they fall off...) saves the turbo and never had a MOT problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
A leaking injector or leaking HP fuel pump, on some engines, will result in diesel in the oil as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Hi there, I need help! Captiva Diesel 2010. The oil service light has come on, I reset it since the oil level was ok. After a couple of months again it come on and... the level of oil has increased!. Is this an indicator that diesel has gone into the oil? I ask at the service and they do not know.
Shall I change the oil and filter again (mayor service done in February).
I was reading previous discussions and seems that short journeys could be the problem? What shall I do? I can't drive it like this.
Thanks in advance!
I know this is an old thread, but I've stopped to comment for future searchers. Tired of seeing false info on forums.

Firstly, don't trust comments on forums that want you to sign up just to enter comments. People whom actually know what they're doing don't have the time to stuff around to make a simple comment.

Secondly, YES! Diesel can easily get into the oil system via a leaky injector. By a leaky injector, I don't mean an injector which drips diesel out the nozell (tip). I mean via a bad seal (copper washer) which every diesel injector has. These seals will begin to leak over time and need to be replaced. These seals are not expensive and can be easily replaced by anyone whom knows anything about diesels.

What you've described with the increased levels of oil, is a common problem especially with the Captivas. The injector, oddly enough, is encompassed inside the tappet/oil cover - only the top of the injector is exposed. If the seal leaks, it leaks directly into the oil system. Very often you wont even know it's leaking because engine power is not affected.

Additionally, as well as diesel getting into the oil system, the oppose happens at low revs (idle). Oil will get sucked into the fuel system and create a lot of grey or blue smoke at the exhaust.

NOTE: Usually the injectors are fine and DO NOT need to be replaced. It's just a failed copper washer. Faulty injectors have different symptoms. Mechanics who suggest this are either incompetent or just wanting to make money off you. Of course, when they replace the injectors, a new seal is also used which in effect fixes the problem, but totally unnecessary.

I don't know if this same injector positioning (inside the oil cover) occurs in other makes. I'd assume so. The Captivas can't be the only engine that adopts this method. It's actually not a bad thing. On other engines, the injector is totally external to the engine, except for the tip. Under this method, if you get a leaky washer/seal, it pushes partially burnt diesel up and out the side of the injector body, creating an awful black, tar-like mess. It's often called "Black Death". The injector gets stuck inside the housing and special eqipment is required to extract it, which is expensive and labourious.

Hope this helps.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,700 Posts
Mechanic, Interesting information on injectors and seals. You are quite right that the simple process of replacing an injector seal can avoid unnecessary cost of a complete new injector.
I've picked up on your comment about 'Tired of seeing false information on Forums'. Are you implying that there is false information on the entries in this Topic? If so please state what is incorrect.

You make no comments about what is probably the most common problem, certainly here in the UK, with short journeys on increased oil level (the Topic issue).
The difficulty in the urban usage of the Captiva is that 'burn off' type of DPF very often doesnt have the opportunity to reach the correct temperature and that users often repeatedly abort (end their journey) before the DPF has completed its cycle. Thus repeated DPF attempts on subsequent journeys results in diesel fuel going down past the rings into the engine oil...... hence the increased oil level.
Post #6 by member T5Nel describes this.

As a new Member you are being identified by the 'system' that you are Located in Australia. It would be helpful if you completed your Sign-Up Location to verify. Also adding your vehicle model / variant to your Signature/Footer is also helpful.
The following link is helpful info for new members:-
Helpful Guidance Using the Forum

.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
694 Posts
I know this is an old thread, but I've stopped to comment for future searchers. Tired of seeing false info on forums.

Firstly, don't trust comments on forums that want you to sign up just to enter comments. People whom actually know what they're doing don't have the time to stuff around to make a simple comment.

Secondly, YES! Diesel can easily get into the oil system via a leaky injector. By a leaky injector, I don't mean an injector which drips diesel out the nozell (tip). I mean via a bad seal (copper washer) which every diesel injector has. These seals will begin to leak over time and need to be replaced. These seals are not expensive and can be easily replaced by anyone whom knows anything about diesels.

What you've described with the increased levels of oil, is a common problem especially with the Captivas. The injector, oddly enough, is encompassed inside the tappet/oil cover - only the top of the injector is exposed. If the seal leaks, it leaks directly into the oil system. Very often you wont even know it's leaking because engine power is not affected.

Additionally, as well as diesel getting into the oil system, the oppose happens at low revs (idle). Oil will get sucked into the fuel system and create a lot of grey or blue smoke at the exhaust.

NOTE: Usually the injectors are fine and DO NOT need to be replaced. It's just a failed copper washer. Faulty injectors have different symptoms. Mechanics who suggest this are either incompetent or just wanting to make money off you. Of course, when they replace the injectors, a new seal is also used which in effect fixes the problem, but totally unnecessary.

I don't know if this same injector positioning (inside the oil cover) occurs in other makes. I'd assume so. The Captivas can't be the only engine that adopts this method. It's actually not a bad thing. On other engines, the injector is totally external to the engine, except for the tip. Under this method, if you get a leaky washer/seal, it pushes partially burnt diesel up and out the side of the injector body, creating an awful black, tar-like mess. It's often called "Black Death". The injector gets stuck inside the housing and special eqipment is required to extract it, which is expensive and labourious.

Hope this helps.
You are wrong to condemn those who comment on car forums as not knowing what they’re talking about and your idiosyncratic comment about those who know what they're doing “don't have the time to stuff around to make a simple comment” defies logic.

Who told you that leaking injector seals are the primary cause of diesel fuel diluting engine oil? In point of fact it is overwhelmingly caused by failed DPF regen attempts. Failure of the sealing washer is relatively uncommon and, by the way, they are NOT always copper.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,700 Posts
Victor, You have come straight to the point in defending those who do contribute technically to this Forum, be they trained engineers or those who have learnt by hands on experience over many years.
I was endeavouring to be somewhat more diplomatic in asking Forum Member Mechanic what exactly his comments were based upon.
The nucleus of the members who regularly try to provide answers on this forum do a great job, along with those who may not be 'skilled' but never the less offer their experience of a solution.
What I didnt understand was the remark by Mechanic about 'Forums which want people to sign up just to make comments'. I dont think this can be aimed at this forum. We have a good mix of genuine questions with the occasional banter and friendship. So may it continue that we help each other.
.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Victor
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top