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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Guys, there are more and more of you posting problems with your Captiva, that the dealer wants to charge you to investigate before they will chase Cheverolet for a Warranty job, or are being fobbed off saying it isnt covered under Warranty.
Providing you are still within the terms and conditions of the manufactures warranty, ie, within the mileage and time constraints, keep pressing them to fix the fault FREE OF CHARGE.

The car MUST be fit for purpose, and a clutch (for instance) that burns out around 25k miles is NOT fit for purpose for todays standards.

As for charging anyone to investigate, tell them where to go. They are supposed to investigate, then claim against the warranty. ONLY if it can be proven that the fault is due to neglect or normal wear and tear should they then expect you to pay.

I'm no lawyer, but I do manage multi-million pound projects for my company to clients in both the public and private sector, so I know my way around a contract. And trust me, in the vast majority of posts I've seen on this forum, regarding Chevrolet refusing to do work under warranty, I can say with high level of confidence, that they are trying to be the "big guy" and frighten you away. I also suspect that some of the "not warranty job" posts are NOT Cheverolet saying no, but the dealers saying this, hoping to get you to pay them to repair. Dont forget, they are franchises, not owned by Chevrolet, so what ever they rip you off for they pocket as profit. I dont think they would get the same price from Chevrolet, if the work was done under a warranty call.



So in summary.... Challenge ALL dealers if your car is still under warranty. If they dont play ball, go to another dealer or contact Chevrolet direct.

Hope this helps...Keep the faith
 

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GM, Along with their sister companies and their competitors will now no longer pay a warranty claim for investigative work if no fault is found. No fault code found by diagnostic because fault has cleared, no payment. your rear wipers not working, then work when dealer tries them, no claim, no payment. Intermittent faults sir, pay us half an hour to look and we'll look.
 

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As far as i'm concerned I have a car with a five year warranty and unless it is a wear and tear item and i have serviced the car annually with the dealer then I expect all faults to be repaired free of charge within those five years.
It's one of the main reasons why i go to the expense of buying a new car. If the dealer decides that they won'tdo the work under warrantyI'll argue and argue my rights, and if that fails i'll send the wife in (because she likes making a scene), and then they usually relent!

Edited by: jonnybgood
 

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Hey Joonybgood, a man after my own heart! I would do/expect the same, (my wife would get on well with yours LOL). Although today took my Captiva into a local dealer today to have the LED Indicator in the wing mirror fixed, and they said as it is still within 12 months of 1st registration it is covered under warranty? Surely it should be covered over the 5 years!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
borat,ireckontheysaidthattomakeitsoundliketheywheredoingyouafavour.Iwouldn'tworryaboutit. Mindyou,anLEDdyingcanbeputdowntowearn'tear,likeabulbgoing,soyouareprobablylucky.
 

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So this is what my in house lawyer took me to <- basically they try to scare you off by saying if we go in and we find its not a warranty issue you pay ! ... however the first 6 months of the product they have to prove to you that it isnt, and you can go into protracted conversation.

They cant withhold keys etc as its not their property its theft if the try to keep it, you advise them to put their claim in writing to you and that you dont accept their position even if you signed the consent form on arrival before you dropped off the vehicle.

Stand your ground ...


<h2 style="margin: 5px 0px; font-size: 14px; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: normal; ">Relevant or Related Legislation:</h2>Sale of Goods Act 1979. Supply of Goods and Services Act 1982. Sale and Supply of Goods Act 1994. The Sale and Supply of Goods to Consumers Regulations 2002.<h2 style="margin: 5px 0px; font-size: 14px; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: normal; ">Key Facts:</h2>""¢ Wherever goods are bought they must "conform to contract". This means they must be as described, fit for purpose and of satisfactory quality (i.e. not inherently faulty at the time of sale).""¢ Goods are of satisfactory quality if they reach the standard that a reasonable person would regard as satisfactory, taking into account the price and any description.""¢ Aspects of quality include fitness for purpose, freedom from minor defects, appearance and finish, durability and safety.""¢ It is the seller, not the manufacturer, who is responsible if goods do not conform to contract.""¢ If goods do not conform to contract at the time of sale, purchasers can request their money back "within a reasonable time". (This is not defined and will depend on circumstances)""¢ For up to six years after purchase (five years from discovery in Scotland) purchasers can demand damages (which a court would equate to the cost of a repair or replacement).""¢ A purchaser who is a consumer, i.e. is not buying in the course of a business, can alternatively request a repair or replacement.""¢ If repair and replacement are not possible or too costly, then the consumer can seek a partial refund, if they have had some benefit from the good, or a full refund if the fault/s have meant they have enjoyed no benefit""¢ In general, the onus is on all purchasers to prove the goods did not conform to contract (e.g. was inherently faulty) and should have reasonably lasted until this point in time (i.e. perishable goods do not last for six years).""¢ If a consumer chooses to request a repair or replacement, then for the first six months after purchase it will be for the retailer to prove the goods did conform to contract (e.g. were not inherently faulty)""¢ After six months and until the end of the six years, it is for the consumer to prove the lack of conformity.
 
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